“Every Breath You Take” the Song and the Controversy

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“Every Breath You Take” the Song and the Controversy

Julia Murphy, Staff Writer

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“Every Breath You Take,” by The Police, is a creepy song. The song was originally released in 1983, and according to VH1, is one of the greatest rock songs of all time.

Topping the Billboard Hot 100 chart for eight straight weeks, how could this song possibly get such a bad rep? Well, according to students at GP, the lyrics are very “stalkerish.”

Yes, the song describes watching someone literally every breath they take, every move they make, and every step they take, Sting will be watching them. What’s so bad about that? Many current songs have similar meanings, and I’m sure Sting’s intent was not to sound like a creepy guy that stalks some girl he’s interested in.

For example, does anyone ever frown upon Taylor Swift’s “You Belong With Me?” No. Yet, Swift talks about basically knowing her interest’s moves. “You’re on the phone with your girlfriend; she’s upset.” The real question should be how does she know that?

In a Blondie song, which many of us still know and sing along to today, talks about driving past someone’s house, seeing if the lights are all out, and see what’s going on. Is that not also relatively creepy?

Not to mention, the Radiohead song “Creep,” though heavily implied by listeners, seems to be about a kid that’s lowkey watching this “angel” that makes his skin cry, and getting completely overwhelmed by not being where he’s supposed to be.

It never dawned on me how “Every Breath You Take” was hated by so many people until I was in Mr. Parker’s class, and the song came on VH1’s 100 greatest rock songs of all time list. All I heard, while I was trying to sing along, considering it is one of my favorite songs, were mutters of “this song is so creepy,” or “he sounds like he’s a stalker,” or even, Joey Bickford with a “I hate Sting so much.”

I am quite offended that students frown upon this song so much. Sting has said that many people misinterpret the meaning of the song, but admits that it has rather “sadistic” lyrics.

What do you think? Should I play this song at my wedding or save it for my stalker to sing to me while he peers in through my window?

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